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Recently, a so-called “leading enterprise in China’s food and beverage industry” has launched “oxygen enriched weak alkaline water”, claiming that “adopting advanced oxygen locking technology” and “the content of dissolved oxygen in the product is 6-10 times higher than that of ordinary drinking water, which can effectively supplement the oxygen needed by human body”. By drinking this water, “the high concentration oxygen in water can be absorbed through the digestive tract mucosa.” To achieve high-efficiency, simple, non-toxic side effects of oxygen supplement. Just like all kinds of “magic food drinks”, the product has been endorsed by idol stars. Once launched, it has aroused great repercussions, and “Qian Jing” is optimistic about it.

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however, whether it is “oxygen rich” or “weak alkali”, it is not a “new technology”. In foreign countries, such products have appeared for a long time. As the company’s press release said, “since the 1990s, a very special type of hyperoxia containing a large amount of active dissolved oxygen has become popular in the United States.”. However, what this press release doesn’t say is that selling this kind of oxygen enriched water in the United States will be prosecuted.

in 1999, there was an oxygen enriched aquatic product called “vitamin o” on the American market, which was advertised in various media, claiming that the product could treat various diseases, including cancer, heart disease, lung disease and so on, through oxygen supplement. In their brochures, more than 150 people have come forward with their own opinions, including the “effects” on various diseases, and some even claim that there is no need for a ventilator to drink this water. For a time, the product was quite popular, and it was said that one of the companies sold 50000 bottles a month. This sales volume may not be worth mentioning for “the leading enterprise in China’s food and beverage industry”, but at that time, for a small company, the newly launched “sky high price water” sold this sales volume quite well.

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in March 1999, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a lawsuit against the two companies that sold the products, accusing them that their claimed efficacy had no scientific basis and belonged to false propaganda. On May 1, 2000, FTC announced that the two companies had agreed to sign an agreement to stop all kinds of false publicity of the product and to pay a fine of $375000. In the United States, a little more than a year to settle such a lawsuit can be said to be extremely quick. The reason why

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say that oxygen enriched water has the function of deception. First of all, the so-called “cutting-edge oxygen locking technology” makes “the dissolved oxygen content in water is 6-10 times higher than that of ordinary drinking water”, which is just playing with scientific terms. The solubility of oxygen in water depends on the partial pressure of oxygen. The dissolved oxygen in water can be greatly increased by blowing oxygen into the water and then pressurized packaging. However, if the bottle cap is opened, it will be connected with the air. If the oxygen solubility exceeds the temperature, it will be released. If you see bubbles in the bottle, it means that the oxygen has run away. Then pour the water into the cup, drink into the mouth, into the stomach, leaving little oxygen left in the water.

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secondly, the absorption of oxygen by drinking water does not hold up in theory – human beings are not fish, and the human body cannot absorb oxygen through the digestive tract. Although some “scientists” put forward the theory of “absorbing high concentration of oxygen in water through the way of gastrointestinal mucosa permeability”, it has not been recognized by the scientific community. In addition, there is no experimental data to support those legendary effects – even if there are more than 150 people’s “personal stories” or the “personal experience” of idol stars, the evidence is still zero. In the deception of

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, the “6-10 times dissolved oxygen” is not a “high level”. There is a company in Australia, which claims that the dissolved oxygen content of its products is 30 times that of ordinary water, so it has the functions of “detoxification, enhancing metabolism, reducing pressure, and improving immunity”. The company sells in the United States and was sued in California in 2011 for false publicity. Although there is no follow-up to the lawsuit, with the FTC suing vitamin o, the Australian company’s chances of winning the lawsuit are slim.

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have no scientific basis whether they are “oxygen enriched” or “weakly alkaline”, and have been refuted repeatedly by the scientific community. “The leading enterprise in China’s food and beverage industry” takes such deceptive products as a breakthrough point for the further development of enterprises, which is the sorrow of China’s food and beverage industry.

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(the editorial edition of this article has been published in the opinion column of people’s network)

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